MFV Token - A global single sign-on and data exchange.




  • A new smart contract rail to enable wallet users to log into, pay and exchange data with Service Providers, swiftly and securely.

    Commerce, and the general process of sales, is normally analogized with a funnel. Prospective Consumers are poured into the top of funnel, with a few pouring out as Paying Consumers from the bottom of the funnel while others disengage throughout the sales process. In this analogy, Consumers can also be non-paying users of any sort of service, such as a social network, mobile app, or free subscription services, where the service tries to realize some desired benefit such as turning a non-user into a registered user or an audience for advertisements - the terms Consumer, Customer and User are used interchangeably. Prospective Consumers can disengage for many reasons, and finding these holes in the funnel and resolving them is a big part of increasing sales and making the most of marketing efforts. According to Nick Szabo, common causes for disengagement are web forms. Forms are tedious to fill and raise concerns for Consumers due to the personally identifiable information (“PII”) requested during registration such as email, credit card, phone numbers, and IP-address. Additionally, Szabo states that the payment step of the form, ultimately the most important step for many Service Providers, is likely to have the highest rate of abandonment.

    Consumers and Service Providers have accepted the
    status quo of data-heavy relationships for too long. Unlike
    in-person transactions, Service Providers are burdened with data collection and security up front, increasingly being targeted by hackers. Consumers are concerned with the wide, unregulated and out-of-sight, distribution of their personal data. That changes today. The MFV Project team has developed a sign-on and data exchange solution. In this paper, we highlight this solution, which is a new sign-on, payment and data framework, that
    eliminates unnecessary form fields and enables Consumers to control their data, pay for and use services quicker. This
    solution incorporates economics that incentivize Service
    Providers to request minimum amounts of Consumer Data
    and disincentivizes bad behaviour such as data over-reach. This solution, and the incentivization architecture, are built
    to shift the world away from the status quo of registration
    and payment forms to a world of higher sales conversions for Service Providers and increased privacy and better user experiences for Consumers.

    Consumers and Service Providers have accepted the
    status quo of data-heavy relationships for too long. Unlike
    in-person transactions, Service Providers are burdened with data collection and security up front, increasingly being targeted by hackers. Consumers are concerned with the wide, unregulated and out-of-sight, distribution of their personal data. That changes today. The MFV Project team has developed a sign-on and data exchange solution. In this paper, we highlight this solution, which is a new sign-on, payment and data framework, that
    eliminates unnecessary form fields and enables Consumers to control their data, pay for and use services quicker. This
    solution incorporates economics that incentivize Service
    Providers to request minimum amounts of Consumer Data
    and disincentivizes bad behaviour such as data over-reach. This solution, and the incentivization architecture, are built
    to shift the world away from the status quo of registration
    and payment forms to a world of higher sales conversions for Service Providers and increased privacy and better user experiences for Consumers.

    Index-of-Worry

    Our proposed solution drastically reduces IoW to one input at the Service Provider and one mobile authorization.

    Index-of-Worry (IoW), as defined by Szabo, is a proxy for the worry caused to
    Consumers about privacy, theft and value received for money spent. Szabo 
    goes on to define the components of IoW:

    IoW = # of lines of a form + # of repeated charges 
    (for content or services of variable value)
    Szabo continues to clarify that if a Service Provider is funded by ads rather than consumer payments, then the proportion of screen space covered by ads, or other reasonable estimate of the delay and distraction of the ads, can be substituted for repeated charges. IoW for a single Consumer varies from business-to-business, but IoW does not change drastically for every new service or merchant a Consumer considers,
    especially where subscription or payments are involved. Below is the IoW for

    popular subscription services


    Marginal Index-of-Worry (MIoW)

    Building on Szabo’s work, we arrive at another analysis
    which underpins the user experience today, this is the
    Marginal Index-of-Worry (MIoW), which is the IoW for every
    additional service a Consumer registers. Today, barring a few centralized single-sign on solutions, Consumers experience
    an MIoW which is equal to the average IoW of all Service
    Providers. From a Consumer experience standpoint, this is repetitive and concerning, resulting in a mental tax which Consumers are increasingly aware of. For Service Providers this is resulting in lower conversion, especially at a time when Consumers are beginning to transact fewer Services, increasing loyalty with Service Providers such as Amazon that offer better customer experiences and are aggressively expanding their offerings horizontally and vertically.  
    Our solution allows the Consumer to securely store their
    data within digital wallets, while also leveraging identity 

    solutions to attest for their identity if required by Service
    Providers. The initial onboarding has an IoW comparable to modern identity solutions and new user registration,
    but dramatically reduces the MIoW for every subsequent
    registration and purchase. The solution also allows Service Providers to onboard Consumers with various permutations of data relationships that may change throughout the Consumer journey. For example, a Service Provider can entice a Consumer to sign-up for a trial of their services by
    not requesting any Payment Method or Personal Data, simply
    allowing the Consumer to sign-on and use the services. In this example IoW is a record low, allowing a safe and fair relationship for the Consumer to explore the services, and
    decide to pay and opt-into a data exchange, if requested by

    the Service Provider.

    MFV

    • Registration & Login

    The MFV solution drastically reduces IoW to a minimum of two inputs, one input at the Service Provider and one mobile authorization for sign-up and sign-on functionality.
    Unlike other SSO solutions, Consumers control their own
    data, on their own mobile devices within digital wallets that have enabled MFV. With MFV, Consumers can manage their data on-device, similar to how they manage their
    cryptocurrency wallets on device. Our framework allows
    bitcoin, other cryptocurrency, and traditional mobile Wallet
    Developers, to offer sign-up and sign-in services for
    Service Providers that support MFV service by integrating

    the MFV Wallet SDK.
    To start, the team developing MFV Gateway and MFV
    Wallet SDK will host and manage the first MFV Gateway
    Node for Service Providers to facilitate secured sign-on and data exchanges between all supported wallets. With
    SSO functionality available to Consumers in their desired
    wallets, Consumers can sign-up for services using their digital wallets, while also paying, pseudonymously if chosen, with the same digital wallet. Following the sign-up, Consumers can sign-in to use the services. Within a digital wallet, the Consumer can also store
    personal data, which Service Providers may request as part of their authentication and payment requirements. Personal Data is never required. Digital Wallet Developers have choice in their

    implementation of the MFV Wallet SDK. For example, Wallet Developers that support credit card payments, may require that Consumer Data is attested to by identity providers, where the Consumer Data is still securely stored
    on device and negotiated for at point-of-sale. Alternatively,
    Wallet Developers that only support cryptocurrencies may opt to implement only the SSO experience of MFV Wallet SDK where SSO relationships can be established with Service Providers  with no support for Personal Data or
    only low-value data such as email and nicknames. Wallet
    Developers may also opt to implement the complete MFV Wallet SDK where Consumers will be free to add data as required, including the ability to import data from other services such as Facebook, or when required, to attest for
    their identity using identity providers. Consumers may elect
    to use digital wallets as suited to their own requirements,
    electing to use multiple wallets, as they do today.
    The MFV Global Single Sign-on and Data Exchange establishes a new channel for Service Providers to request Personal Data securely and fairly. They are required to incentivize users for any datasets requested, with incentives weighted automatically specific to the data type requested. All incentives to Consumers are with
    MFV Tokens, which are funded Service Providers to the Consumers, with fees, as a percentage of the incentive, split
    between MFV Gateway Nodes and Wallet Developers that 

    support the MFV experience. Wallet Developers, Service
    Providers and MFV Gateway Nodes are given freedom to implement the desired authorization experience ranging from allowing Consumers to redeem the incentive for that transaction or allowing Consumers to collect MFV to be used for future purchases.
    All data, including the non-identifiable authentication
    token and payment information, are negotiated and communicated to the Service Provider through the MFV
    smart contract. Today, with SSO services communicate
    data directly to Service Providers upon a successful user authorization. In order to provide Consumers options for which digital wallets to use for sign-on and data exchanges, MFV Gateway Nodes only facilitate the exchange, rather than act as the central store for the Consumer’s data. As such, Service Providers that integrate the MFV Gateway
    Node can request data from users, choosing to pay or incentivize them for each data field requested, and
    Consumers can authorize from any wallet that supports MFV, choosing to support multiple wallets if so desired.
    Consumer Data can be requested in two states via the MFV contract. The first, Secured Authorization Contract (“SAC”), is an encrypted state where the Service Provider
    wants access to Consumer data only in the event of some sort of breach of service terms or other malicious activity. In this relationship, Service Providers never see the Consumer
    Data while while a live MFV sign-in and/or transactional contract exists between them and the Consumers. Unique
    to MFV, the Service Provider does have the option to break the contract, effectively breaking the service contract in the process, for reasons such as abuse or other breach of contract, but they will be penalized by never being allowed to negotiate a new authentication, payment and

    data contract through MFV with that Consumer again. This penalty exists to incentivize Consumers not to abuse, or
    otherwise act nefariously with the Service Provider. Once broken, Service Providers receive the Consumer Data
    that was securely held. With the SAC, Consumers and Service Providers may have a harmonious, and long-term
    commercial relationship where Consumer Data is never exchanged. The second state, Open Authorization Contract (“OAC”), allows the Service Provider to freely access and read the Consumer Data requested as part of the sign-in
    and data exchange relationship with the Consumer. With the increasing demand for privacy, and opt-in or
    reward-based opt-in, Service Providers will find themselves
    reward Consumers for their patronage and data. In addition to this growing trend, Service Providers are starting to think
    critically about their business and security. Specifically,
    Service Providers are reconsidering storing and managing
    personally identifiable data about their Consumers and opting for SSO or two-factor authentication services that
    attest for the user’s identity instead. More importantly, Payment Processors that integrate the MFV Gateway Node,
    can subsequently offer the MFV Sign-on & Data Exchange
    to their customers, the Service Providers, as a value-add and new revenue stream versus transaction fees only.
    Consumers using digital wallets with MFV SSO can rest assured that their data, if requested by the
    Service Provider, originates from their wallets only. After registration and payment, their sign-on relationship is
    similar to other SSO services where authorizations will
    have an expiry, be limited to the devices they were initiated from, and have the ability to manage active sessions from their digital wallets.

    • Payments

    Payments continue to be the leading cause of abandonment during checkout for users. In addition to the worry associated with privacy and theft concerns Consumers experience, there are worries around the value of the goods and services. For this reason, it is suggested that Payment Processors lead in hosting and maintaining MFV Gateway Nodes MFV, when coupled with Payment Processors, offers a seamless user experience for Consumers that allows them to establish a sign-on, data and payment relationship with Service Providers. Instead of Service Providers hosting their own MFV Gateway Node independently, Payment Processors can offer their MFV Gateway Node as a value-added rail integrated with their payment gateways. In addition to increased transaction fees as

    a result of increased conversion rates experienced by Service Providers, Payment Processors receive revenue as a percentage of incentives brokered, playing an integral role in brokering the sign-on and data exchange between Service Providers and Consumers. Adoption by Payment Processors plays an integral role
    to the MFV Global Sign-on and Data Exchange. Whereas MFV, from a Consumer Data standpoint, is decentralized by Wallet Developers implementing the MFV Wallet SDK, adoption by Payment Processors increases the
    decentralization of MFV Gateway Nodes.
    In addition to brokering the SSO and data exchange,
    MFV Gateway Node also facilitate redemption of MFV, at point of sale. The MFV Gateway, coupled with bitcoin or other cryptocurrency wallets, becomes a compelling

    full-stack sign-up, sign-in, data incentive & payment service
    that will allow any Service Provider to easily authenticate users and accept payments. This solution is more powerful
    than integrating centralized SSO solutions, and fast tracks the adoption of anti-money laundering (AML) and know-your-customer (KYC) focused identity providers at the

    wallet level.. To generate interest and adoption from Service Providers, The MFV Project team will develop a payment

    gateway and establish partnerships with Service Providers to adopt the payment and MFV Gateway in its entirety.  As more Service Providers adopt the MFV Gateway, Wallet
    Developers, and Payment Processors will have confidence to invest in implementation of the MFV Wallet SDK and

    MFV Gateway, respectively.

    MFV Token

    The MFV Token is the the only token and method of exchange that is supported by the MFV Global Single Sign-
    on and Data Exchange. Consumers earn MFV when paying
    for or using supported services. MFV Token may also be exchanged with supported

    Payment Processors in place of payment processing fees or other services. Available immediately, MFV Token holders may redeem their tokens for payment processing fees incurred with The MFV Project team, subject to change as wider utility increases, including use as incentives.

    • Token Supply

    A total of 1 billion MFV Tokens are generated and available
    for use within the MFV Global Single Sign-On and Data Exchange network.
    No additional tokens are expected to be generated at this time. If additional tokens need to be generated

    for unforeseen reasons, for example the adoption of
    MFV Wallet SDK by a large social network or messaging
    platform, the tokens will be distributed as an airdrop to all
    token holders with 30-days notice, with mechanics and
    details of the airdrop being communicated publicly.

    • Token Allocation

    The MFV Token is the the only token and method of exchange that is supported by the MFV Global Single Sign-
    on and Data Exchange. Consumers earn MFV when paying
    for or using supported services. MFV Token may also be exchanged with supported

    Payment Processors in place of payment processing fees or other services. Available immediately, MFV Token holders may redeem their tokens for payment processing fees incurred with The MFV Project team, subject to change as wider utility increases, including use as incentives.

    A total of 1 billion MFV Tokens are generated and available
    for use within the MFV Global Single Sign-On and Data Exchange network.
    No additional tokens are expected to be generated at this time. If additional tokens need to be generated

    for unforeseen reasons, for example the adoption of
    MFV Wallet SDK by a large social network or messaging
    platform, the tokens will be distributed as an airdrop to all
    token holders with 30-days notice, with mechanics and
    details of the airdrop being communicated publicly.

    • 10% of all MFV Tokens, or 100,000,000 MFV, are allocated to purchasers

    in the Token Sale.

    • 33% of all MFV Tokens, or 330,000,000 MFV, are allocated for future

    Token Sales.

    • 33% of all MFV Tokens, or 330,000,000 MFV, are allocated to incentivize sustained adoption of MFV Global Single Sign-On & Data Exchange by Service Providers, MFV Gateway Nodes, Wallet Developers and the

    MFV ecosystem.

    • 23% of all MFV Tokens, or 230,000,000 MFV, is retained for The MFV

    Project team.

    • 1% of all MFV Tokens, or 10,000,000 MFV, are allocated for the Integrated

    Philanthropy program.

    • Token Sale

    Eligible Purchasers
    • Service Providers, including individuals such as independent freelancers, sole proprietors, part-time contractors, that will exchange Tokens for services with supported Payment Processors or merchants, • Service Providers, including individuals such as independent freelancers, sole proprietors, part-time contractors, that will use MFV
    to incentivize Consumers

    • Payment Processors, or other prospective MFV Gateway Node hosts, that are purchasing MFV as inventory to be sold to Service Providers • Wallet Developers who wish to incentivize adoption by their users by
    topping up any MFV incentives given by Service Providers.

    Open Opportunities

    Work alongside smart and ambitious people to disrupt how the world transacts. You'll be challenged. You'll learn. You'll punch above your weight class. Join us.

    • Partnerships Development

      Toronto, Ontario

    • Microservices API Developer

      Toronto, Ontario

    • Cloud Systems Engineer

      Toronto, Ontario

    • Android Developer

      Toronto, Ontario

    • iOS Developer

      Toronto, Ontario

    • Agile Product Manager

      Toronto, Ontario

    • Agile Product Manager

      Toronto, Ontario

    • Smart Contract Developer

      Toronto, Ontario

    • Smart Contract Designer

      Toronto, Ontario


    World-class benefits & perks

    • Unlimited Vacation

    • Paid Time-off for Volunteering

    • Paid Time-off to contribute to public blockchain & blockchain for charity projects.

    • Insurance, Health & Wellness Coverage

    • Maternity & Paternity Leave

    • Gym Membership

    • Training & Tuition Reimbursement

    • Conference Attendence Budget

    • ...and MORE!

    Website | Whitepaper |


    Medium Blog:





Looks like your connection to Cryptocentral was lost, please wait while we try to reconnect.